Didn't know there was a new freon they were putting in vehicles.

dishstaller

Administrator
Staff member
My Wife's 2018 Ford's AC started acting up and I suspected it was low on freon....a lot of new ac units have a very low tolerance for low freon. Grabbed my trusty freon guages and...crap....wouldn't fit the connectors. Noticed on the data plate that rather than the standard R134, it called for R-1234YF. Ran down to O'Reilly's and they didn't have it in stock. I asked why.....price!! $129 for a can and guage. Went back home and looked around and found this on Ebay



$68 and you can buy extra cans in the future for around $35. I can ONLY imagine how much a repair shop would have charged...probably a $300+ bill. Anyway, since this is the new freon probably cycling through your vehicle's ac system, I figured it was worth a post for your DIYers out there.

BTW, as SOON as I added a little freon the ac started working properly. Mini-split ac units are the same way....just a tad low and they'll start freezing up. You can buy R-410 and the guages for under $200 on Ebay.....can't buy it at a supply store unless you have a license but you can buy it online and they can ship it to you :rolleyes:
 

y2k

Former Dish Network Sufferer
I would imagine you have had some experience with a/c servicing down there...First I've heard of this r-1234...wouldn't that be covered under warranty on a 2018? I was looking at what fridges take now and it's 134a, same as what they switched cars over to in the 90s...unless that also is now changing
 

y2k

Former Dish Network Sufferer
I was familiar with R22 being the fridge & home a/c stuff, with R12 for cars. The 12 is now extremely pricey, and I suppose the 22 is the same. Propane is interesting; it has good refrigerant qualities (and is obviously cheap) and was used in some units a few decades ago until some fires happened. It's flammable, which is why it's not used in cars and has been avoided elsewhere.

I changed my car over to 134a myself; purged the old refrigerant oil from coils and compressor, used PAG. New receiver/drier. Original compressor, condenser, evaporator. Also switched to a variable-flow orifice tube. Green O-rings everywhere, of course. Had been told that the original hoses would leak out the 134a, but hasn't been an issue. works good
 

claude greiner

Administrator
Staff member
I was familiar with R22 being the fridge & home a/c stuff, with R12 for cars. The 12 is now extremely pricey, and I suppose the 22 is the same. Propane is interesting; it has good refrigerant qualities (and is obviously cheap) and was used in some units a few decades ago until some fires happened. It's flammable, which is why it's not used in cars and has been avoided elsewhere.

I changed my car over to 134a myself; purged the old refrigerant oil from coils and compressor, used PAG. New receiver/drier. Original compressor, condenser, evaporator. Also switched to a variable-flow orifice tube. Green O-rings everywhere, of course. Had been told that the original hoses would leak out the 134a, but hasn't been an issue. works good
At the office I have a 30 Ton unit that runs R12, which was converted to R22 and takes 90 pounds.

literally it’s over $1000 to fill.

The next option I believe is R410, but the pressures are so high I doubt my system can handle the higher pressures since the system was installed in 1948.

In the meantime I have been buying 2 Ton mini split systems for around $800. Got about 10 of those, now I just need to hire a crane to take it to the roof
 
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